Tag Archives: color history

The Nakeds – Sliver

Ultima ll’s “The Nakeds” is noted as one of the most groundbreaking color collections in cosmetics history, due to its inclusion of a full range of skin tones and the shades that naturally complement them.  Designed by Kevyn Aucoin in the 80′s, it’s also been credited with influencing many of the makeup lines that followed in the 90′s and who expanded further on this color concept.

The Nakeds- Sliver was a promotional item given as a gift with purchase and is only the size of a credit card.  It holds a small amount of four shades from the collection:

  • Lipchrome #4
  • Cheek Color #5
  • Eyecolor #3
  • Eyecolor #5

The Sliver also has a sponge tip applicator tucked neatly into a slot in the card and a mirror for on-the-go touch ups.  I found this adorable gem tucked away in my mother’s vanity and you can imagine how my heart fluttered upon seeing it.  Still untouched and unused,  it waited ever so patiently for me to find it, take it away and make it part of my treasured archives.

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1922 Kodachrome Film Test

It’s been about 6 months since my last post because lots of new and exciting things have taken hold of my free (aka Blog) time. One of them being the pursuit of a marketing degree to balance my creative side with some official business chops. As you can imagine, school in addition to being a makeup artist doesn’t leave a lot extra hours in the day, but I had to make some time this morning for this video from Kodak. It’s as screen test for Kodachrome film shot in 1922. After only seeing moving images from this era in black and white, this color footage is pure magic! 

It seems the film itself didn’t actually capture the colors at the time of shooting, but was a complex process to achieve the lovely color palette we see here.  To read more fascinating and detailed information about this video, check out Kodak’s blog post.

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Color: A Natural History of the Palette

Victoria Finlay’s “Color: A Natural History of the Palette” is an amazing book and it not only changed the way I look at color visually, but how I value it both in a literal and spiritual sense.  It’s  truly difficult to imagine that in our modern world filled with technology, where we can create almost anything with a computer, that we cannot always make or reproduce some colors.  That’s where this book begins- with the realization of that moment by a curious little girl.

When she was only 8 years old, Ms. Finlay was on a trip with her father visiting an old cathedral.  While he is telling her about the stained glass windows being made 800 years ago, he also says,  ”and today we don’t know how to make that blue.” That shocking moment stayed with her until years later, still curious, she decided to explore places like Australia, Chile, Mexico and Afghanistan to find out where color really comes from.   What she learns and shares is beyond fascinating and  like I said- you will never look at color the same way again.

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